Glendale College's Student Magazine
Thursday October 23rd 2014

2010

Vol. 3, No. 1: People: An internationally famous composer, a rapper who advocates for education, and an actress who explodes stereotypes from the inside out. New poetry and illustrations from Angela Lee and Jack Najarium. Illegal immigration is causing a crisis throughout the Southwest. This year’s “May March” specifically protested Arizona’s SB1070 law. The proliferation of marijuana clinics and dispensaries has many communities concerned. Here’s more on the new legislation. Chessboxing is a new hybrid sport that’s causing a stir. Find out more about the unlikely history of a discipline that merges Kung-fu movies with rap music and comic books.

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