Glendale College's Student Magazine
Wednesday November 26th 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Vicki Gardner’

Glendale Public Library: Special Collections

Glendale Public Library: Special Collections

He recollects in the most thoughtful way, as if he is watching film footage or seeing still images flash before him. “I’ve always lived in Glendale. Went to Glendale elementary school, junior high, high school and then Glendale College in the ’60s. Yep, I’ve been [Read More]

Latest Topics

Flavor of the Month: Gluten-free diets

Flavor of the Month: Gluten-free diets

Once little more than a fad, what was formerly a nutritional recommendation has for some adherents become a way of [Read More]

Jorge Galindo: Undocumented Immigrant Hopes to Change his Own Community

Jorge Galindo: Undocumented Immigrant Hopes to Change his Own Community

It is 2:30 on a Wednesday afternoon. I’m scheduled to meet Jorge Galindo at the DMV in Lincoln Heights. Today marks a [Read More]

Review: the MGN 5-Star Theater and Frame 128

Review: the MGN 5-Star Theater and Frame 128

For many years, the centerpiece of American life was the television, where families gathered together glued before the [Read More]

The “N” Word

The “N” Word

On any given day walking through the Glendale campus, conversations may be overheard and one word that is heard often [Read More]

The Future of Jazz in America

The Future of Jazz in America

With the advent of the celebrity-as-musician trend in the 21st century, artistry is quickly going by the wayside. Many [Read More]

NASA's Image of the Day

Supercomputer Simulation of Magnetic Field Loops on the Sun

 
Magnetic fields emerging from below the surface of the sun influence the solar wind—a stream of particles that blows continuously from the sun’s atmosphere through the solar system. Researchers at NASA and its university partners are using high-fidelity computer simulations to learn how these magnetic fields emerge, heat the sun’s outer atmosphere and produce sunspots and flares. This visualization shows magnetic field loops in a portion of the sun, with colors representing magnetic field strength from weak (blue) to strong (red). The simulation was run on the Pleiades supercomputer at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing facility at NASA's Ames Research Center in Moffett Field, California.  The knowledge gained through simulation results like this one help researchers better understand the sun, its variations, and its interactions with Earth and the solar system. Image Credit: Robert Stein, Michigan State University; Timothy Sandstrom, NASA/Ames > Related: NASA showcased more than 35 of the agency’s exciting computational achievements at SC14, the international supercomputing conference, Nov. 16-21, 2014, in New Orleans.
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