Glendale College's Student Magazine
Tuesday October 21st 2014

Posts Tagged ‘Vicki Gardner’

Glendale Public Library: Special Collections

Glendale Public Library: Special Collections

He recollects in the most thoughtful way, as if he is watching film footage or seeing still images flash before him. “I’ve always lived in Glendale. Went to Glendale elementary school, junior high, high school and then Glendale College in the ’60s. Yep, I’ve been [Read More]

Latest Topics

Flavor of the Month: Gluten-free diets

Flavor of the Month: Gluten-free diets

Once little more than a fad, what was formerly a nutritional recommendation has for some adherents become a way of [Read More]

Jorge Galindo: Undocumented Immigrant Hopes to Change his Own Community

Jorge Galindo: Undocumented Immigrant Hopes to Change his Own Community

It is 2:30 on a Wednesday afternoon. I’m scheduled to meet Jorge Galindo at the DMV in Lincoln Heights. Today marks a [Read More]

Review: the MGN 5-Star Theater and Frame 128

Review: the MGN 5-Star Theater and Frame 128

For many years, the centerpiece of American life was the television, where families gathered together glued before the [Read More]

The “N” Word

The “N” Word

On any given day walking through the Glendale campus, conversations may be overheard and one word that is heard often [Read More]

The Future of Jazz in America

The Future of Jazz in America

With the advent of the celebrity-as-musician trend in the 21st century, artistry is quickly going by the wayside. Many [Read More]

NASA's Image of the Day

Hubble Sees Turquoise-Tinted Plumes in Large Magellanic Cloud

 
The brightly glowing plumes seen in this image are reminiscent of an underwater scene, with turquoise-tinted currents and nebulous strands reaching out into the surroundings. However, this is no ocean. This image actually shows part of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a small nearby galaxy that orbits our galaxy, the Milky Way, and appears as a blurred blob in our skies. The NASA/European Space Agency (ESA) Hubble Space Telescope has peeked many times into this galaxy, releasing stunning images of the whirling clouds of gas and sparkling stars (opo9944a, heic1301, potw1408a). This image shows part of the Tarantula Nebula's outskirts. This famously beautiful nebula, located within the LMC, is a frequent target for Hubble (heic1206, heic1402).  In most images of the LMC the color is completely different to that seen here. This is because, in this new image, a different set of filters was used. The customary R filter, which selects the red light, was replaced by a filter letting through the near-infrared light. In traditional images, the hydrogen gas appears pink because it shines most brightly in the red. Here however, other less prominent emission lines dominate in the blue and green filters. This data is part of the Archival Pure Parallel Project (APPP), a project that gathered together and processed over 1,000 images taken using Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, obtained in parallel with other Hubble instruments. Much of the data in the project could be used to study a wide range of astronomical topics, including gravitational lensing and cosmic shear, exploring distant star-forming galaxies, supplementing observations in other wavelength ranges with optical data, and examining star populations from stellar heavyweights all the way down to solar-mass stars. Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA: acknowledgement: Josh Barrington Text: European Space Agency
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